Why Are the Pipes Making Groaning and Other Noises in Your Home?

There can be several different underlying causes for noises coming from the water pipes within your home. It is important to determine what type of sound the pipes are making to better diagnose and troubleshoot the problem.

Water pipes that make a groaning or hissing noise are often indicating a constriction somewhere in the water line. As the water flows through the narrower section, it will create this noise. This problem commonly develops in faucets and toilets as washers and internal fixtures wear out.

Plumbing Problems

To determine the source of the problem, you will want to check both the hot and cold water lines. Start by turning on just the cold water. Then shut off the cold water and turn on just the hot. If the sound is evident with either just the hot or cold water on or is persistent with both water lines, the faucet needs to be replaced.

TIP: If you notice the noise occurs in all the faucets of your home, chances are there is a restriction somewhere in the plumbing lines.

With toilet hissing sounds, the flapper and/or ballcock valve could be worn out and need to be replaced. Remove the back toilet cover, flush the toilet, and watch how the tank refills. If it continues to fill with water past the desired shutoff and runs down the overflow, this, too, could create a hissing sound.

Another type of noise your pipes can make is a pounding or banging sound. This noise occurs when the force of the water flowing through the pipes is abruptly stopped. For instance, as your washing machine is filling with water, you may notice this type of sound when it stops filling.

You may also notice this sound if the pipes inside your walls are not secured in place. As the water flows through the pipes, it can cause movement and a “banging” against the interior wall. To remedy loose pipes, have your plumber secure them in place using different methods.

For more persistent banging noises, there are special “shock absorbing” devices that can be incorporated into your home’s plumbing. These devices contain air and are added as “T” sections in different areas. When the water is shut off, rather than “bang,” it will attempt to force itself into the “T,” and the noise will be stopped.

Water Pipes Groaning Noise

In addition, depending on the type of plumbing used in your home, hot water lines can make different noises as the water goes from cold to hot. This is referred to as thermal expansion. There are different ways to resolve this problem. Again, you will want to consult with a professional plumber to determine the most appropriate resolution for your home.

TIP: Do not ignore the noises your pipes are making. In many cases, your home’s plumbing is alerting you to a problem that needs your immediate attention. Ignoring it and not getting it checked out could lead to more costly plumbing repairs later.

To schedule a plumbing inspection for your Houston-area home, please feel free to contact MET Plumbing at 281-599-3336 today!

How to Stop a Leaking Faucet from Keeping You up at Night

You are just drifting off to sleep and then you here a sound that wakes you back up: Drip, drip, drip. The faucet on one of the sinks in your home is dripping water and making enough noise to keep you awake. While you might close the bathroom or bedroom door, or wrap a towel over the dripping faucet, this solution is not the right way to fix a leaking faucet.

Stop a Leaking Faucet

What Causes a Faucet to Drip?

There can be all sorts of reasons for a dripping faucet, based upon the style and model. One of the more common causes is because the washers used in the mechanisms to turn the faucet on and off wear out and are not sealing correctly. Another cause for leaky faucet is the washer in the sink outlet cover has worn out.

Finding the Source of the Leak

There are several things you can do to try to pinpoint where the leak is coming from before calling a plumber. You could unscrew the outlet cover and replace the rubber washer to see if this resolves the problem. Another option is to start by shutting off the hot water first, wait and see if the dripping stops, and if not, turn the hot water back on, and then shut off the cold water.

If the drip persists, shut off both hot and cold water lines. Now, if the leak stops, it often indicates the mechanisms inside the faucet are worn out and need replaced. This can also be a sign you need to replace the entire sink faucet if it is older, as fixing the mechanisms that turn the water on and off may not fully resolve or stop the faucet from dripping.

What If I Hear Dripping and Water Is Not Leaking Out of the Faucet?

Sometimes, the cause of leaks occurs underneath the sink and faucet. You will want to open the cabinet doors and see if water is pooling or any items stored here are wet. For this type of leak, it could be the result of a faulty connection to the faucet. You can try tightening the water lines to the underside of the faucet to see if this stops the leak.

Faucet Repair

For more complicated leaks, like where water is dripping out of the faucet and under the sink, then you will want to call a professional plumber. There could be multiple causes and each one will need to be addressed to fully resolve leaks and dripping faucets. For instance, both the faucet and the water lines under the sink could all need to be replaced.

Ignoring a dripping faucet will not make the problem go away and it can worsen, causing your water bills to increase significantly. Plus, fixing the drip will help you get a good night’s rest. For dripping faucets, water leaks, and other plumbing problems, contact the Houston plumbing experts at Met-Plumbing by calling 281-599-3336 today!

Reverse Osmosis Versus Other Water Filtration Methods

If you are considering various types of water filtration methods and systems for your home, it is important to understand how each one of these works. Some people make the mistake of not consulting with a professional plumbing repair company with knowledge of water filtration systems ahead of time. This has led to purchasing the wrong type of filtration system for their homes.

Water Filtration Methods

The first thing you need to determine is what type of water you have. The vast majority of water throughout the United States, and even here in Texas, is considered hard water. Hard water is full of calcium and mineral deposits that can cause scaling on pipes and faucets. In some cases, there can be excess iron in the water, along with certain unpleasant smells and tastes, depending on where you live.

Hard water is commonly found in homes that have “well water.” The other type of water you could have is soft water. This is water that has been treated using a water softener to remove the calcium and some of the minerals from hard water. If you have “city water,” then, in most cases, the water has been softened, but not always. In addition, not all “city water” has been properly filtered. Rather, it could have added chlorine and fluoride in it.

Now that you know about the different water types, the next thing you need to do is decide exactly what is it you want to remove from the water. Do you want to remove visible particles, sediment, and other such items from the water? Does the water have an odor to it you want to eliminate? Does the water have a funny taste to it you want to correct?

It is also beneficial to ask your plumber to do a water test. The water test will show exactly what is in your water, so you can use this information to further refine your filtration system for your home.

Reverse Osmosis Systems

Reverse osmosis filtration systems filter out just about everything from the water by forcing the water through a semi-pervious membrane. This membrane has very minute openings only small enough for a water molecule to pass through, removing between 90 and 99 percent of sediment, minerals, fluoride, chlorine, and more from the water. This method of water filtration can also help address concerns over odors and taste.

Plumbing Repair

Selective/Substrate Filtration Systems

This type of water filtration uses different substrates/filters to target specific containments in the water. For instance, a layer of carbon is used to remove chlorine, heavy metals, and other organic chemicals from the water. Selective/substrate filtration systems can be customized to fit your specific needs while improving the overall quality of your water. This method will leave a certain amount of minerals in the water, but they tend to cost less compared to reverse osmosis systems.

In the end, it really comes down to your needs and what it is you want to be removed from your water. To learn more about the different filtration methods, or for assistance in selecting and installing a system for your home, contact MET Plumbing at 281-599-3336 today!